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Friday, May 1, 2020 | History

3 edition of Non-conventional textile waste water treatment found in the catalog.

Non-conventional textile waste water treatment

Ahmed El-Nemr

Non-conventional textile waste water treatment

  • 97 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Nova Science Publishers in Hauppauge, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Water,
  • Textile fibers,
  • Waste disposal,
  • Dyes and dyeing,
  • Textile waste,
  • Purification

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    Statement[edited by] Ahmed El Nemr
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTD899.T4 N66 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25018477M
    ISBN 109781621000792
    LC Control Number2011031635

      Microorganisms for Dye Removal from Textile Wastewater. The treatment of textile effluent may follow several physical or chemical methods (Figure 1).Nevertheless, the use of microorganisms or microbial enzymes or the combination of this with a physicochemical method offers a better result with economic : Radia Jamee, Romana Siddique.


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Non-conventional textile waste water treatment by Ahmed El-Nemr Download PDF EPUB FB2

The textile industry is amongst the major contributors to environmental pollution but it is very important for the nation's economy. This book provides the latest research on a non-conventional method effective in treatment of textile : Ahmed El Nemr.

This book provides the latest research on a non-conventional method effective in treatment of textile wastewater. Discover the world's research 17+ million membersAuthor: Ahmed El Nemr.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Genre/Form: Electronic books: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Non-conventional textile waste water treatment. New York: Nova Science Publishers, © From the batch adsorption treatment, we concluded that activated neem leaf powder (a-NLP) is found to be the best among all adsorbents investigated for textile wastewater treatment.

Maximum removal of COD (%), BOD (%), and color (%) are attained at a temperature of K with contact duration of 90 min and dosage of 25 g/L of a-NLP. Textile Wastewater Treatment Options: A Critical Review.

Textile industry is one of the largest water-consuming industries in the world, and its wastewater contains many pollutants such as dyes, degradable organics, detergents, stabilizing agents, desizers, inorganic salts, and heavy metals.

wastewater in the textile factory is that it provides partial or full re-use of water. Produced waste water has to be cleaned from, fat, oil, color and other chemicals, which are used during the several production steps.

Figure 2. Various methods for the treatment of wastewater from textile plants The treatment processes may be categorizedFile Size: KB. The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of treating textile wastewater by adsorption process using low-cost adsorbent.

Sludge from textile effluent treatment was thermal and chemical activated and used to uptake the dye RR under different conditions of dye concentration, initial pH of the solution and chemical by: aspects of textile fibres etc.

The book covers complete details of textile processing with the standard parameters of effluents treatment which is the burning problem for the textile processors.

Needless to say that this book will be of immense use to textile processors, consultants and chemists engaged in water and waste water treatment, research. We will give you any of the 2 books from the below list if you fulfill our conditions. If you want to download this book, you need to write an unique article about textile related topics.

The article must be at least words or above and contains valuable information. No copy paste is allowed and we will check plagiarism to confirm. Therefore, sustainable wastewater treatment could be the best choice for the textile industries with respect to the current issues.

So, it is important to discuss and champion awareness mechanisms which help to reduce the current issues with respect to the textile Cited by: 2. A comparative study was done using conventional model with static electrodes in two phases under same textile wastewater. The findings revealed that the optimal conditions for textile wastewater treatment were attained at RT = 10 min, CD = 4 mA/cm2, rotation speed = rpm, temperature = 25°C, IED = 1 cm and pH = Author: Ahmed Samir Naje, Mohammed A.

Ajeel, Peter Adeniyi Alaba, Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan. INDUSTRIES WASTE WATER TREATMENT METHODOLOGIES Deepa Chandran. Abstract: Textiles is one of the largest industries in the world. The textile industry generates huge quantities of complex chemical substances as a part of unused materials including dyes in the form of wastewater during various stages of textile manufacturing and Size: KB.

In book: Non-Conventional Textile Waste Water Treatment, Edition: 1st, Chapter: 5, Publisher: Nova Science Publishers, Editors: Ahmed El Nemr.

Application of Persulfate in Textile Wastewater Treatment: /ch As textile and dyeing industries increase, pollution due to effluent discharges from the same industries also increase and become of great concern to aAuthor: Fagbenro Oluwakemi Kehinde, Salem S.

Abu Amr, Hamidi Abdul Aziz. Based on the results of the advanced oxidation technologies experiments, it was found that PDS/Fe(II)/UV is the best treatment method for real textile wastewater.

Read more DataAuthor: Zakir Khan. The aim of this book is to look into textile wastewater treatments shortly. It is designe During the dyeing process, losses of colorants to the water sources can be toxic and mutagenic and also decreases light penetration and photosynthesis by: 1.

Ciardelli G, Ranieri N () The treatment and reuse of wastewater in the textile industry by means of ozonation and electroflocculation.

Water Res – CrossRef Google Scholar Clarke EA, Steinle D () Health and environmental safety aspects of Cited by: The series is comprised by the following books, namely: (1) Wastewater characteristics, treatment and disposal; (2) Basic principles of wastewater treat- ment; (3) Waste stabilisation ponds; (4) Anaerobic reactors; (5) Activated sludge and aerobic biofilm reactors; (6) Sludge treatment and disposal.

When these industries were selected, waste water treatment plants that included different treatment methods were considered. The chemical and/or biological treatment methods used in the treatment of textile industry wastewater were characterized, problems in treatment plants were explained and solutions were proposed.

Materials and MethodsCited by:   Parimal Pal, in Industrial Water Treatment Process Technology, Hybrid Forward Osmosis Technology in Treatment of Textile Wastewater. Textile wastewater containing multiple textile dyes, inorganic salts, and organic additives is an ideal case for application of FO technology to extract pure water from such a complex system instead of.

is a platform for academics to share research papers. Characterization and Treatment of Textile Wastewater covers fundamental knowledge of characterization of textile wastewater and adsorbents; naturally prepared adsorption and coagulation process for removal of COD, BOD and color.

This book is intended for everyone actively working on the environment, especially for researchers in textile wastewater, as the problem of disposal of textile. In book: Non-Conventional Textile Waste Water Treatment, Edition: Available, Chapter: Biotechnological Applications of Fungi in Textile Wastewater Bioremediation, Publisher: Nova.

Dye is the most difficult constituent of the textile waste water to treat. The type of dye in the effluent could vary daily or even hourly, depending upon the campaign. It is generally difficult to degrade waste water from the textile industry by conventional biological treatment processes, because the BOD/COD ratio is less than Electro coagulation, textile wastewater, up flow reactor, COD removal, current density.

Introduction. Textile industries are among the most polluting industries in terms of the volume and complexity of treatment of its effluent discharge. Textile industries consume large volumes of water and chemicals for wet processing of by: 9.

Water treatment with different kind of pollutants, is large-scale, because of many cleaning and removing steps involved. The diagram above shows a general overview over the several steps in water treatment in the textile industry.

Screening, straining. This first step of treatment is to remove small particles from the process water. Water Treatment Solutions. The textile industry is very water intensive. Water is used for cleaning the raw material and for many flushing steps during the whole production. Produced waste water has to be cleaned from, fat, oil, color and other chemicals, which are used during the several production steps.

Handbook of Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant Operations, the intent of the author is twofold. The Þrst intent is to consolidate the information and experience in waterworks and wastewater treatment plant operations that have evolved as a result of technological advances in the Þeld, and as a result of the concepts and policies.

The combination of anaerobic and aerobic method is typically implemented in real practice which use an anaerobic process to treat textile wastewater of chemical oxygen demand (COD), followed by the use of aerobic polishing treatment to treat the resulting textile wastewater of low COD (Wang et al., ).Cited by: The purpose of this review book is to provide the latest research to find out a nonconventional method effective in treatment of textile wastewater.

As reported in chapter 1, textiles processing wastewaters, typically contains dyes in the range mg l   Sanjay K. Sharma is Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry, JECRC University, Jaipur, India, where he teaches engineering chemistry, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, spectroscopy and organic chemistry.

He has published 16 books on chemistry and more than 60 research papers. Sharma is also serving as Editor-in-Chief for the RASAYAN. Concentration and Recovery of Dyes from Textile Wastewater Using a Self-Standing, Support-Free Forward Osmosis Membrane Meng Li Key Laboratory of New Membrane Materials, Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science & Technology, NanjingP.

ChinaCited by: 8. Wastewater treatment is a process used to remove contaminants from wastewater or sewage and convert it into an effluent that can be returned to the water cycle with minimum impact on the environment, or directly reused.

The latter is called water reclamation because treated wastewater can be used for other purposes. The treatment process takes place in a wastewater treatment. Wastewater Treatment Plant Design Handbook Paperback – J by Water Environment Federation (Author)Price: $ Waste Water Treatment Methods.

By Adina Elena Segneanu, Cristina Orbeci, Carmen Lazau, Paula Sfirloaga, Paulina Vlazan, Cornelia Bandas and Ioan Grozescu. Submitted: April 23rd Reviewed: October 21st Published: January 16th DOI: /Cited by: In the textile industry, the main pollution source of wastewater comes from dyeing and finishing.

Wastewater generated from dyeing and finishing factories in Hong Kong also created a significant proportion of water pollution. Application of biological processes in the treatment of textile wastewater has been reported extensively.

The treatment of wastewater presents the dual challenge of protecting public health and the environment. The presence of increasing amounts of chemical contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, pesticides and dyes resulting from agricultural, industrial or municipal activities has potential negative impacts on ecosystems.

Non-Conventional Textile Waste Water Treatment, by Ahmed El Nemr Treatment of Textile Dyes Wastewater by Coconut Coir Activated Carbon, by Taimur Khan and Malay Chaudhuri Treatment of Textile Industries Waste.

Table.5 Treatment Process for Treating Waste-Water From Textile Units (Carmen, Z. and Daniela, S. ) Treatment Methodology Treatment stage Advantages Limitations Physico chemical treatment 1 Priecipitation, coagulation flocculation Pre/ main treatment Short detention time and low capital costs.

Relatively good removal efficiencies. A Review of State-of-the-Art Technologies in Dye-Containing Wastewater Treatment – The Textile Industry Case By Serkan Arslan, Murat Eyvaz, Ercan Gürbulak and Ebubekir Yüksel We are IntechOpen, the world's leading publisher of Open Access by: The textile industry is one of the major sources of large volumes of wastewater, especially from dyeing and finishing processes.

Common contaminants in textile wastewater include materials containing biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, color and other soluble inorganic and organic : $Based on the high affinity of chitosan for different contaminants, there are many studies where these properties of chitosan for removing of dyes from solution or textile wastewater [27, 28], organic matter (e.g.

lignin and chlorinated compounds) in pulp and paper mill wastewater, heavy metals and phenolic compounds in cardboard-mill Cited by: